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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

3 edition of Colliding stellar winds in O-type close binary systems found in the catalog.

Colliding stellar winds in O-type close binary systems

Colliding stellar winds in O-type close binary systems

final technical report : June 1989 through June 1991

  • 32 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Atlanta, GA, [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Stellar winds.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprincipal investigator: Douglas R. Gies.
    Series[NASA contractor report] -- NASA-CR-188610., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-188610.
    ContributionsUnited States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15384287M

    Colliding-wind massive binaries (CWB) Mean stellar wind: up to several K Shocked gas in individual stellar winds: a few K Shocked gas in the wind-wind interaction region: up to several K Physics of stellar winds, see Stan Owocki's talk Binary system made of two stars belonging to the category of OB- or WR-type stars No compact. This computer simulation shows the gas density around a colliding wind binary named WR The star locations are marked by yellow dots, and decreasing gas density is indicated by the sequence of red, white and blue colours. In this simulation, a solar-mass O-type star orbits the hotter and more massive (72 solar mass) Wolf-Rayet star WR

    A huge shock front is formed in the region where these two stellar winds collide, heating up the material in the wind to extremely high temperatures. At around 50 million degrees Celsius, this matter radiates brightly in the X-ray range. The particles in the stellar wind are not hot enough to emit gamma radiation, though. ‘Stellar winds are ubiquitous, but their properties and mechanisms span an enormous range. This badly needed book by two well known researchers brings together theory and observation to provide an excellent, integrated treatment of a fascinating subject.’ Hollis R. Johnson - .

    In this work we showed that the wind–wind collision model of a binary system in a highly eccentric orbit can explain the periodic events in the 2–10 keV X-ray light curve of η Carinae, as well as the shell-like events at optical and UV wavelengths, without any increase in the primary mass loss rate, as postulated by Corcoran et al. (a).   M15 created the first 3D prints of output from simulations of a multi-dimensional and time-varying astrophysical system; the colliding stellar winds in the massive η Car binary. These 3D prints helped reveal previously unknown "finger-like" structures that occur at orbital phases shortly after periastron, and which protrude radially outward.


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Colliding stellar winds in O-type close binary systems Download PDF EPUB FB2

In close binary systems of O-type stars, the individual stellar winds will collide between the stars to form shock fronts. The existence of the shock region can be established through observations of excess X-ray emission and orbital phase-related variations in UV wind features and optical emission by: 4.

AO Cas, a short-period, double-lined spectroscopic binary, is studied as part of a search for spectroscopic evidence of colliding stellar winds in binary systems of O-type by:   We present H-alpha and He I A line profiles for the eccentric orbit binary Iota Ori.

We have applied a tomography algorithm which uses the established orbital velocity curves and intensity ratio to reconstruct the spectral line profiles for each star. The He I profiles appear as pure photospheric lines, and H-alpha shows variable emission in the line core throughout the Cited by: 7.

HD = WR is a W-R+O binary system with a yr, highly elliptical (e = ) orbit. It shows variable, nonthermal radio emission over its orbital period that is explained as synchrotron. A spectroscopic search for colliding stellar winds in O-type close binary systems.

IV - Iota Orionis. By Douglas R. Gies, is consistent with an origin between the stars which probably results from a dramatic focusing of the primary's stellar wind at periastron. We also present IUE archival spectra of the UV wind lines N V A and C IV.

The structure and X-ray characteristics of the interaction region of colliding stellar winds are analyzed for the case of a WR + O binary system, with allowance made for the effect of stellar wind. A stellar collision is the coming together of two stars caused by stellar dynamics within a star cluster, or by the orbital decay of a binary star due to stellar mass loss or gravitational radiation, or by other mechanisms not yet well understood.

Astronomers predict that events of this type occur in the globular clusters of our galaxy about once ev years. 1 INTRODUCTION. Colliding winds occur in various types of stellar binaries, including those with massive OB and Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars, lower mass eruptive symbiotic systems containing a white dwarf and red giant star which undergo a ‘slow nova’ outburst and binary systems which contain one or two pulsars blowing a pulsar wind(s).

About this book In this IAU Symposium on Wolf--Rayet stars, binary aspects received ample attention, notably because of the recognition that many observations of spectral and photometric variability at all accessible wavelengths are related to colliding winds or other forms of wind interaction.

Now, XMM-Newton and Swift have found a “Rosetta stone” for such winds in a binary system known as Cyg OB2 #9, located in the Cygnus star-forming region where. In this contribution, we present detailed 2D-calculations of the expected soft X-ray emission spectrum from colliding stellar winds in binary systems.

We consider two cases where the system is composed of (a) Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O stars, and (b) pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars of low- and intermediate-mass. Radiatively driven winds are found in all massive lumi- nous stars, and in close binary systems the individual winds may collide and form a bow shock.

A 3D dynamical model of the colliding winds in binary systems E. Parkin and J. Pittard School of Physics and Astronomy, the University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT as well as systems with O-type and Wolf–Rayet stars. wind from a pulsar collides with the stellar wind. Abstract: A study of the stellar wind properties of O-type close binary systems is presented.

The main objective of this program was to search for colliding winds in four systems, AO Cas, iota Ori, Plaskett's star, and 29 UW CMa, through an examination of high dispersion UV spectra from IUE and optical spectra of the H alpha and He I lambda.

IMAGE: Using the High Energy Sterescopic System H.E.S.S., astrophysicists have identified colliding stellar winds from the double star Eta Carinae as a. However, OB stars belonging to binary systems are usually several times brighter at X-rays, and this has been explained by colliding winds (Chlebowski ).

Moreover, the binary’s L Xcan be much higher if the companion of the OB star is a WR star rather than another OB star. Prospects for Detecting Colliding Winds of Massive Stars with GLAST-LAT: Reimer, A.; Reimer, O. Radio Behavior of Four Southern Non-Thermal O-Type Stars: Benaglia, P.; Koribalski, B.

Non-Thermal Radio Emission from O Stars: Binary Versus Single: Van Loo, S. FUSE Observations of Colliding Winds in Three Magellanic-Cloud WR. Unlike the handful of other colliding wind systems, the style of the collision in Cyg OB2 #9 remains the same throughout the stars’ orbit, despite the increase in intensity as the two winds meet.

A binary star as a cosmic particle accelerator (Nanowerk News) With a specialised telescope in Namibia a DESY-led team of researchers has proven a certain type of binary star as a new kind of source for very high-energy cosmic Carinae is located lightyears away in the constellation Carina (the ship's keel) in the Southern Sky and, based on.

systems of close binary stars, the winds from each star will collide between the stars and be diverted along a bow shock (Luo, McCray, & Mac LowAp.

J.,). Theoretical Predictions for the Cold Part of the Colliding-Wind Interaction-Zone: Folini, Doris; Walder, Rolf: Colliding Stellar Wind Binaries: Theory vs.

Observations - Do We Believe What We See? Zhekov, Svetozar A. Radiatively Driven Colliding Stellar Winds: Dynamics and X-Ray Emission: Pittard, Julian M.

General Discussion. Unlike the handful of other colliding wind systems, the style of the collision in Cyg OB2 #9 remains the same throughout the stars' orbit, despite the increase in intensity as the two winds meet.The colliding wind system that we study in this pa-per is a low-mass counterpart to the well studied collid-ing wind binaries (CWBs1) which are systems contain-ing two high-mass stars with strong interacting stellar winds.

Since the vast majority of high-mass stars are in binary star systems (e.g. Chinietal), CWBs are very common.